Friday, 28 June 2019

Building Independent Reading Practice


Sifting through year-end notes from BrightFish teachers, I found some really interesting observations among the usual feature requests. The common thread? Students who needed a lot of support in BrightFish Reading at the beginning of the fall term were working independently by the spring. It’s partly a happy side-effect of improvements in fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. But I think it really goes beyond skills development. Independent reading practice not only reinforces classroom instruction, it also builds confidence and can foster a newly discovered love of reading. 

In their 2010 research, Johnson & Keier put it this way: “If children are not spending a significant portion of their day engaged in texts that allow them to practice the strategies we are modeling, then we cannot possibly expect them to take on these strategies and use them independently.”

Meghan Holmes, a BrightFish teacher from Spout Springs Elementary, shared this observation about one of her students: "At the start of the year, Abran lacked the confidence to work on BrightFish Reading independently. He would look for teacher support during each lesson in order to gain a better understanding of the task at hand. Now Abran leads our class in BrightFish. He is always excited to complete a book and receive the Congratulations screen."

Establishing a regular reading practice for struggling learners requires more than just access to text. Here are a few strategies for developing independent reading:

1. Start small: For many students, especially those with learning disabilities, scaffolding provides the support to internalize a routine for reading. Pre-reading activities that start with simpler activities, incorporate repetition and a mastery learning approach help students to set their own pace. For example, story units in BrightFish Reading start with word and sound match activities, working from the easiest words up to the most difficult phrases in a passage. Mastery requires a minimum of 97 percent accuracy and consistent speed.

2. Build stamina: Breaking text down into smaller chunks makes it possible for students to move from shorter sessions to longer periods of sustained reading. Students are more likely to keep going if they are challenged but not frustrated. Moving from short paragraphs to longer passages in a structured sequence creates a sense of control and achievement. Rewarding concrete steps along the way motivates students to spend more time reading.



3. Level the field: Providing age-appropriate material at a student’s instructional level makes it easier to access text and experience success with independent reading. Struggling readers are more likely to engage with text that is not frustrating or difficult to comprehend.

4. Encourage self-monitoring: Independent reading eventually becomes its own reward, but building that practice requires students to be actively engaged in the process. Setting expectations and enabling students to monitor their own progress creates accountability. Ask students to establish daily or weekly goals and keep a reading log to write down their observations and activities. Software can also help with self-tracking. In BrightFish Reading, students always know where they are in a story unit – and how much more work they need to do. They can review their work and see their scores on each activity. Teachers can review the data with each student in 1:1 sessions to discuss strategies for improvement.



5. Start a conversation: If students are reading the same material, encourage them to discuss the story and what they’ve learned from it. Retelling and sharing impressions about a story, the author’s purpose, main ideas and language encourages active reading and increases understanding of the text.

Do you have ideas on how to encourage independent reading practice? We would love to hear from you! Comment below or send an email to support@brightfishlearning.com.

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